The Ultimate Guide to Credit Cards
Tuesday, November 24, 2020
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2020's Best Chase® Credit Cards

Below are our staff ratings of 2020's best Chase® credit card offers. Chase® has a reputation for offering some of the best cash back, rewards, and business cards on the market.

Average APR
17.16%
Average Annual Fee
$31.66
Rate Trend
No Change
since last month
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The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which CardRates.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). CardRates.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers.

17 FAQs About Chase Credit Cards

Eric Bank
By: Eric Bank
Finance Expert
Updated:
17 FAQs About Chase Credit Cards
CardRates.com Guide: Chase®

The best Chase credit cards are also among America’s most popular, which may explain why Chase is the country’s largest card issuer with a 16.6% market share. Obviously, consumers have great interest in Chase cards, and that means an almost unslakable thirst for answers to their most burning questions.

If you are a Chase fan or are just Chase-curious, these answers to frequently asked questions about Chase credit cards will provide you with valuable insights into this premier credit card company.

1. What is Chase Bank?

Formally known as JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., Chase Bank is one of the country’s largest multinational financial institutions providing a wide array of products and services. The bank is a descendant of the Bank of the Manhattan Company founded in 1799.

Chase LogoAfter more than two centuries of mergers and acquisitions, today’s Chase Bank produces a stable of leading personal and business credit cards that offer top rewards around the globe.

Beyond its credit card operation, Chase Bank provides commercial and retail banking services, treasury services, transaction processing, investment banking, and asset management in more than 100 markets worldwide. The bank has approximately 5,100 branches and 16,000 ATMs nationwide.

The modern JPMorgan Chase — most commonly just called Chase — is one of the two largest banks in the US, and one of the world's largest credit card issuers. Many of the most popular credit cards in the market are solely branded or co-branded by Chase, and its Ultimate Rewards® program consistently ranks as cardholder favorite.

2. How Does a Chase Credit Card Work?

A Chase credit card is a handy piece of plastic that fits in your wallet and allows you to charge purchases instead of shelling out cash. These cards provide credit, which is like a loan to pay for the items you charge with the card. You obtain a Chase credit card through an application process that involves your credit history and credit score, as well as data about your income and expenses.

If you receive a Chase credit card, the following characteristics will be apparent either on the card or in the accompanying disclosures:

  • The credit card’s name, such as Chase Sapphire Reserve®, Chase Freedom FlexSM, or Chase Freedom Unlimited®. Chase issues 30 different credit cards, most of which are co-branded with partnering companies.
  • The card’s payment network — Visa or Mastercard.
  • The card’s account number and security PIN.
  • The credit limit, which caps the amount you can charge on the card.
  • The terms of the card agreement, including the schedule of APRs and fees.

You use your Chase card to buy products and services, either in-person, over the phone, or online. When used in-person, you insert the card into a terminal that scans the card’s chip or magnetic stripe, verifies that the transaction can proceed, and updates your account information.

Chase breaks the year into monthly billing cycles. A grace period of at least 21 days beyond the cycle end date ends with the payment due date for the cycle. If you pay your entire balance by the due date, you’ll be charged no interest on purchases. You must pay at least the specified minimum amount by the due date to avoid late penalties.

You can finance your purchases by stretching payments over multiple cycles. Balances carried forward incur interest expenses based on the annual percentage rate (APR). You will be charged interest until you pay off your balance. You can also get a cash advance from your Chase card that will incur interest every day until you repay it — cash advances have no grace periods.

Chase cards offer various perks (i.e., rewards and benefits) when you use them. Typically, you select cards that provide the perks you find most attractive, subject to the constraints each card places on its availability. These constraints include your creditworthiness and the number of credit accounts you already have.

3. What are the Different Types of Chase Credit Cards?

You can classify Chase credit cards in several ways, including their functional focus, form of rewards, introductory promotions, and annual fees, among other features. Here is a summary of the different types of Chase credit cards:

  • 0% Intro APR Credit Cards: Offers new cardmembers a period after account opening of no interest charged on carried balances for purchases and/or balance transfers. The introductory period usually runs from six to 18 months.
  • Air Miles Credit Cards: These cards are aimed at frequent flyers and provide rewards that include bonus miles or points redeemable for free flights and other travel benefits.
  • Business Credit Cards: They reward business owners with bonus offers, cash back, points, or miles on all business purchases. Provide flexible redemption options and business-related data and services.
  • Cash Back Credit Cards: Earn cash rewards on all purchases, as well as bonus cash on some transactions.
  • EMV Credit Cards with Chip: These cards have an embedded chip that provides enhanced security when used at a chip card reader.
  • Hotel Credit Cards: You earn points from dining and travel that you can redeem toward hotel stays. You can choose among different hotel partners to earn each bonus point amount when booking your favorite lodging.
  • No Annual Fee Credit Cards: You get benefits, bonuses, and rewards without having to pay an annual fee.
  • No Foreign Transaction Fee Credit Cards: Make international travel less expensive by choosing a card that doesn’t charge foreign transaction fees.
  • Refer-A-Friend Credit Cards: You earn a bonus for each friend you refer who becomes a cardmember.
  • Points Credit Cards: Earn points for purchases that can be redeemed through Chase Ultimate Rewards.
  • Travel Credit Cards: You’ll get bonus points or miles for travel and dining purchases.

With so many available options, there is probably at least one Chase card that’s perfect for your lifestyle.

4. Which Chase Cards Offer Cash Back?

Cash back cards offer cash rewards and bonuses. You earn cash back on purchases according to the card’s reward scheme — flat rate on all purchases, multiple tiers of reward rates (e.g., 2x points to 5x points) based on the type of merchant, or a quarterly rotating bonus category roster of merchants that earn high rewards.

Here is a rundown on the Chase cards that offer cash back:

  • Chase Freedom Unlimited®: A tiered rewards card that offers a sign up bonus, an introductory 0% APR promotion on purchases, and no annual fee.
  • Chase Freedom FlexSM: Offers high cash back rewards on a quarterly rotating bonus category roster of merchants. This no-annual-fee card offers an introductory 0% APR promotion on purchases and a signup bonus for spending a set amount during an initial period after opening the account.
  • Chase Freedom® Student: A flat-rate cash back card for students who have little or no credit history. The card offers a signup bonus and a $0 annual fee.
  • Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Card: A tiered credit card that offers an immediate Amazon gift card upon approval. The card charges no annual fee and is exclusively available to eligible Amazon Prime members.
  • AARP® Credit Card from Chase: A tiered card that earns higher rewards on purchases at gas stations and restaurants. You also get a welcome bonus and pay no annual fee.
  • Ink Business Unlimited® Credit Card: This Chase business credit card offers unlimited flat-rate cash back, a signup bonus, and no annual fee.
  • Ink Business Cash® Credit Card: A tiered Chase business credit card with high rewards on select business categories. There is a signup bonus and an introductory 0% APR promotion.

5. Which Chase Cards Offer Points?

The Chase cards offering point rewards are:

  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card: An ultimate rewards card with higher-tiered rewards for travel and dining. Offers a signup bonus and may offer special promotions. This card charges a moderate annual fee.
  • Chase Sapphire Reserve®: A premium ultimate rewards card with higher-tiered rewards for travel and dining. Offers a welcome bonus, an annual travel credit, airport lounge access, and may offer special promotions. This card charges a high annual fee.
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Priority Credit Card: The top card in the Chase Southwest personal card trio, offering higher tiered rewards for flights on Southwest with no blackout dates, a signup reward, and annually awarded anniversary points. This card charges a moderately high annual fee.
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card: The bottom card in the Chase Southwest personal card trio, offering higher tiered rewards for flights on Southwest with no blackout dates, a signup reward, and annually awarded anniversary points. This card charges a moderate annual fee.
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Credit Card: The middle card in the Chase Southwest personal card trio, offering higher tiered rewards for flights on Southwest with no blackout dates, a signup reward, and annually awarded anniversary points. This card charges a moderate annual fee.
  • British Airways Visa Signature®: A tiered points card offering rewards for travel on British Airways, Aer Lingus, and Iberia, and for selected hotel stays. The card offers a two-part sign up bonus and charges a moderate annual fee.
  • Aer Lingus Visa Signature®: A tiered points card offering rewards for travel on Aer Lingus, British Airways, and Iberia, and for selected hotel stays. The card offers a two-part signup bonus and charges a moderate annual fee.
  • Iberia Visa Signature®: A tiered points card offering rewards for travel on Iberia, British Airways, and Aer Lingus, and for selected hotel stays. The card offers a two-part signup bonus and charges a moderate annual fee.
  • Marriott Bonvoy Boundless™: Offers a signup bonus as well as points for staying at participating Marriott hotels. This card charges an annual fee.
  • Marriott Bonvoy Bold™: Offers a signup bonus as well as points for staying at participating Marriott hotels. This card charges no annual fee.
  • World of Hyatt Credit Card: Card offers a two-part signup bonus and bonus points for spending at Hyatt hotels. This card charges an annual fee.
  • Disney® Premier Visa® Card: Offers a statement credit signup bonus and tiered points on select purchases. Points are redeemable at most Disney locations and toward airline travel. Card offers special travel financing and shopping savings. This card charges an annual fee.
  • Disney® Visa® Card: Offers a statement credit signup bonus and flat points on all purchases. Rewards are redeemable at most Disney locations. This card offers special travel financing, shopping savings, and charges no annual fee.
  • IHG® Rewards Club Premier Credit Card: You can earn a signup bonus and points on every purchase with a higher reward rate for stays at IHG hotels.
  • IHG® Rewards Club Traveler Credit Card: You can earn a signup bonus and points on every purchase with a higher reward rate for stays at IHG hotels. This card charges no annual fee.
  • Starbucks® Rewards Visa® Card: A tiered rewards card that awards points (stars) that don’t expire and a signup bonus. This card charges an annual fee.
  • Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card: Offers a signup bonus and rewards on travel and other select business expenses. You can receive premium travel rewards with this card. It charges an annual fee.
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Performance Business Credit Card: Offers a two-part signup bonus and tiered points for Southwest purchases and select business expenses. You also earn an annual anniversary bonus. This card charges a moderately high annual fee.
  • Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Business Credit Card: Offers a signup bonus and tiered points for Southwest purchases. You also earn an annual anniversary bonus. This card charges a moderate annual fee.

Chase offers a larger variety of points cards than cards offering cash back or miles. Most of these points cards are co-branded with travel or hotel partners.

6. Which Chase Cards Offer Miles?

The Chase cards offering mileage rewards are:

  • United ClubSM Infinite Card: A premium card featuring tiered rewards on United purchases, dining, and all other travel. You also get a United Club membership and free checked bags. The high annual fee is waived for the first year.
  • United GatewaySM Card: You can earn a signup bonus and tiered rewards for United, local transit and commuting, and gas station purchases. This card charges no annual fee.
  • UnitedSM Explorer Card: Earn a signup bonus and tiered rewards for United purchases, hotel stays, and restaurant dining. You get a free first checked bag. The moderate annual fee is waived for the first year.
  • United℠ Business Card: Offers a signup bonus and higher-tiered rewards on selected purchases. Also get free first checked baggage and other travel benefits from United. The moderate annual fee is waived for the first year.

The only mileage cards from Chase are the four co-branded with United. They differ in the reward rates and benefits they offer.

7. What Can I Redeem My Rewards For?

All rewards earned on non-co-branded Chase cards can be redeemed for cash in the form of a statement credit or a deposit to your checking account. You can cash out your rewards online, over the phone (at 1 (800) 432-3117), or at a local Chase branch.

But that’s just the start of your redemption options. If you have a Chase Sapphire card, you can redeem points for cash at the rate of a penny per point. For Chase cash back cards, you can convert your cash back into Chase Ultimate Rewards points.

Chase Ultimate Rewards® Points

The Chase Ultimate Reward program allows you to maximize the value of your Chase rewards. You can access the program at its website and redeem your Chase points for travel, dining, and other rewards.

Chase Ultimate Rewards Screenshot

You can redeem points for a myriad of rewards on the Chase Ultimate Rewards website.

If you have a Chase cash back card, you can use your cash back to purchase each Ultimate Reward point as long as you have at least one Chase card that already earns Ultimate Rewards points (i.e., a Chase Sapphire card).

You can convert your cash back to Ultimate Rewards points at the rate of one point per penny. Simply go to the website and transfer cash back to one of your points cards (Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card, Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card, or Chase Sapphire Reserve®). You can then use your points from combined purchases to shop on the Chase Ultimate Rewards site.

By the way, you can earn extra Ultimate Rewards points via Shop through Chase. You’ll find deals that offer bonus points on select purchases from dozens of top stores.

Using Chase Ultimate Rewards® Points for Travel

You can redeem your Ultimate Rewards point totals for travel-related purchases. Each point in your Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card account or Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card account is worth 25% more when used this way. Chase Sapphire Reserve® points are even more valuable, worth 50% more when used for travel.

Your options for booking travel-related redemptions include:

  • Flights: You can search and book flights from more than 250 airlines, and you can cancel online within 24 hours of booking without triggering a cancellation fee.
  • Hotels: Book hotels and vacation rentals worldwide without booking fees. You may be able to access special pricing with Ultimate Rewards.
  • Rental cars: You can shop Hertz, Alamo, Enterprise, National, and more, including one-way and off-airport rentals. Special pricing may be available.
  • Cruises: You can choose from a wide variety of cruises on the world’s best cruise lines.
  • Events and venues: You can shop for tickets to various attractions at your destination.

You can combine your Chase card and your points to pay for travel purchases via Ultimate Rewards.

Other Redemption Options

You can also redeem Chase Ultimate Rewards points for:

  • Cash: Statement credit or direct deposit to most U.S. checking or savings accounts.
  • Gift cards: You can redeem your points for gift cards from many popular restaurants and retailers. You have more than 175 gift cards to choose from.
  • Amazon.com Shop with Points: Link your card to your Amazon.com account to immediately redeem your points toward eligible Amazon.com orders.
  • Apple Ultimate Rewards Store: Shop for your favorite Apple gadget with Chase Ultimate Rewards points.
  • Chase Pay®: Shop with points online or in a merchant’s app. Chase will apply your points toward purchases as a statement credit. You can also link Chase Pay to your PayPal account to unlock shopping at millions of participating places.
  • Pay Yourself BackSM: You can apply statement credits toward eligible purchases made in the last 90 days. Eligible purchases include grocery store purchases and those at home improvement stores, as well as restaurant dining (including takeout and eligible delivery services), and donations to select charitable organizations. Points used this way are worth 25% to 50% more.
  • Chase Dining: Make a reservation or order takeout from a participating restaurant in your city. Points are also good for wineries and bars.
  • Transfer to Travel Partners: You can transfer points 1:1 to the rewards program of any Chase travel or hotel partner.

It seems like the folks at Chase have put a lot of thought into their Ultimate Rewards program, which may be one reason why Chase cards are the most popular in the United States.

The rules for redeeming points or miles on Chase co-branded credit cards are determined by the co-branding partner. Generally, you can’t combine co-branded points with Ultimate Rewards points.

8. What is the Best Chase Card to Get?

We like Chase credit cards, and the following are three of our favorites.

Our preferred cash back card from Chase is the Chase Freedom Unlimited®. In addition to its generous rewards scheme, this cash back card offers an easily attainable signup bonus and a long introductory 0% APR promotion to new cardholders. There is no minimum redemption amount for cash back, and rewards never expire while the account remains open.

If you want a travel rewards card and don’t mind paying an annual fee, we recommend the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. It offers a substantial signup bonus, bonus points for dining and travel, and points that are worth 25% more when redeemed for travel via Chase Ultimate Rewards.

Business owners may prefer the Ink Business Unlimited® Credit Card. It offers both a signup bonus and a 0% APR promotion during an introductory period after opening the account. You earn unlimited flat cash back rewards on all purchases and you can obtain employee cards at no additional cost.

9. Are Chase Credit Cards Hard to Get?

While Chase cards are not particularly hard to get, they do not offer cards targeting consumers with bad credit. This is illustrated by the lack of a secured credit card from Chase. In general, we don’t recommend applying for a Chase card if your FICO score is below 600.

In fact, most Chase cards are aimed at consumers with very good to excellent credit scores above 740. Notwithstanding this corporate stance, the Chase Freedom cards are easier to get than are its Chase siblings. Your ability to qualify for a Chase card will depend heavily on your personal situation as well as your previous experiences with Chase Bank.

None of the Chase Freedom cards charge an annual fee, and their APRs are reasonably competitive. Perhaps the hardest Chase card to get is the Chase Sapphire Reserve®, a premium card with a high annual fee. We judge this card’s minimum acceptable credit score in the 660 to 670 range on the FICO score.

10. Which Chase Card is the Easiest to Get?

We’ve found that the Disney® Visa® Card has the lowest required credit score (570) in the Chase stable of credit cards now that Chase Slate has been retired. Granted, this card only makes sense if you are planning a trip to a Disney venue. If you are, this card will earn you extra rewards from purchases at Disney resorts, movies, theme parks, cruises, and merchandisers.

As previously mentioned, Chase made sure that it’s popular Chase Freedom FlexSM cash back card was fairly easy to obtain. The Chase offerings from Southwest are the easiest co-branded cards to get, with the UnitedSM Explorer Card not far behind.

The Chase Freedom® Student is unique among the Chase offerings in that it has no specific credit score requirement. Rather, it’s aimed at students who typically have little or no credit history. If you happen to be a student, this is the card for you.

11. What Credit Score Do I Need for Chase Freedom?

The credit scores required for the three Chase Freedom cards are:

  • Chase Freedom FlexSM: 600+
  • Chase Freedom Unlimited®: 636+
  • Chase Freedom® Student: N/A

Note that these are the minimum required scores and by no means are you assured to be approved. Sometimes, consumers with relatively low scores are accepted by an issuer due to unique circumstances, such as a long period of on-time payments.

To illustrate that figuring out required credit scores is not always easy, we have recommended the Chase Freedom Unlimited® card to consumers with excellent credit. This just highlights the fact that the Chase Freedom Unlimited® is attractive to a wide swath of consumers.

12.  Which Chase Card is Best for Business Owners?

Chase offers three business credit cards and we give the highest rank to the Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card. This card offers bonus rewards for select travel and business purchases. Your points are worth 25% more when you redeem them for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards.

Ink Business Preferred Credit CardAdditional benefits include employee cards at no additional cost, fraud protection, zero liability protection, extended warranty protection, purchase protection, and auto rental collision damage waiver. If you or your employees travel for business, you’ll appreciate the free travel and emergency assistance services that can help with medical, legal, and other problems when you’re away from home.

It also provides 1:1 point transfers to leading frequent flyer programs, a generous signup bonus, and cellphone protection. This card charges an annual fee but no fee for foreign transactions.

If you’d like a no-annual-fee business card with high cash back rewards on select business categories, you may prefer the Ink Business Cash® Credit Card. Other than the tiered rewards structure, this card closely resembles the Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card. The card provides real-time fraud monitoring to safeguard your account against signs of fraudulent activity.

13. Does Chase Allow Balance Transfers?

All Chase non-co-branded cards allow balance transfers, but none offer a special introductory 0% APR on transfers. However, since Chase cards feature relatively low APRs, you can still save on interest by transferring balances from other credit cards with higher interest rates. If you own multiple Chase cards, select the one with the lowest transfer APR to receive the balances transferred from more expensive cards.

Chase, like most issuers, charges a one-time fee for each balance transfer. In return, you reap the benefits of balance transfers, including:

  • Reduced interest costs: You’ll save money by moving your balances to a credit card with a lower APR.
  • Debt consolidation: You won’t have to schedule payments each month for multiple credit cards or be saddled with multiple minimum payments.
  • Fast repayment: By putting all balances onto one card and not using the others, you can concentrate on paying down the debt faster without the distraction of multiple minimum payments.

If you use balance transfers to reduce your overall credit utilization ratio, you may see your credit score improve. Do not cancel old credit card accounts after transferring their balances, even if you no longer plan to use the old cards, because this will increase your credit utilization ratio and negatively impact your FICO score.

14. How Can I Increase My Chase Credit Limit?

If you’d like a higher credit limit on a Chase card, you have a few options you can pursue:

  • Ask for a higher limit: This is the most straightforward way of increasing your credit line. To position yourself for approval, wait at least six months before asking, pay off your bills in full each month, and keep your credit utilization ratio below 20%. Sometimes, you can finagle a higher limit by coupling it with a request to transfer your balances. When negotiating a higher limit, emphasize why you’ve earned it rather than why you need it. Issuers respond favorably to creditworthy behavior. Do not ask for a higher limit shortly after opening new credit accounts, lest Chase interprets it as a sign of financial distress.
  • Be patient: Chase may spontaneously offer you a higher limit if you exhibit creditworthy behavior and boost your credit score over time. This is more likely if you improve your credit profile, say from fair to good or from good to excellent.
  • Get a new Chase card: If you’ve improved your credit profile while already owning a Chase card, you can apply for a new Chase card. Chances are that if you are approved, the new card will carry a higher limit.

Generally, you shouldn’t try to increase your credit limit when you are in financial distress. Doing so may land you in a debt spiral that is difficult to break short of declaring bankruptcy. Rather, adopt credit card habits that will help you stay out of debt.

15. Do Chase Cards Charge Foreign Transaction Fees?

When you travel internationally, you have to deal with foreign currency translations on purchases. For instance, if you are visiting Merry Olde England, your credit card purchases will need to account for the dollar-to-pound translation rate. Some cards will charge you a foreign transaction fee to cover the costs in processing these purchases.

Chase cash back cards charge foreign transaction fees, but their points cards do not. These include Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card, Chase Sapphire Reserve®, and Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card. In addition, many of Chase’s co-branded travel and hotel cards refrain from charging foreign transaction fees.

Chase cash back cards typically charge 3% of the amount of each foreign transaction in U.S. dollars. Different issuers determine their own foreign transaction fees. Ideally, you’d like a card with no foreign transaction fee and no annual fee.

16. What is the 5/24 Rule?

Chase is the leading issuer of credit cards in the U.S. In fact, its cards are so popular that it established the 5/24 Rule to keep a lid on the number of new cards it issues. The Rule places a limit on the number of new cards (5) you can own within a specified period (24 months).

This rule applies to all of your new credit accounts, not just the ones at Chase. Even if you have a high credit score and would otherwise easily qualify for a Chase card, the 5/24 Rule can prevent you from getting a new Chase credit card. If you are a card churner, this will definitely put a crimp in your style.

At one point, Chase exempted some of its co-branded cards from the 5/24 rule, but alas, those glorious days are now behind us.

17. How Do I Prequalify for a Chase Credit Card?

Chase allows you to prequalify for its credit cards through a standard preapproval process in which you submit some preliminary information. Chase will use your data to do a soft credit inquiry on your credit history to see whether your request for a new card will likely be approved or declined.

Chase Prequalify Page

You can see if you prequalify for a Chase card without affecting your credit score on the bank’s website.

A soft credit check involves the card issuer contacting one of the major credit bureaus and collecting certain limited information. The inquiry is called soft because it won’t hurt your credit score, part of which is impacted by full-blown requests for new credit. If Chase preapproves you, you can then apply for the card, and the chances are excellent (but not guaranteed) you’ll be accepted after Chase performs a hard credit check.

Prequalifying is a good idea because it saves you from the damage of a hard inquiry in cases where you would most likely be turned down for a new card. That damage can be a five- to 10-point drop in your FICO score that lasts for up to one year. The damage can be greater if you flood the zone with multiple requests for new credit within a short period (under two to three months).

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

The information on this page was reviewed for accuracy on .

About the Author

Eric Bank Eric Bank Finance Expert

Eric Bank has been covering business and financial topics since 1985, specializing in taking complex subject matters and explaining them in simple terms for consumer audiences. In addition to his work on CardRates.com, Eric has appeared regularly on Credible.com, eHow, WiseBread, The Nest, Get.com, Zacks, Chron and dozens of other outlets. A former software engineer, Eric holds an M.B.A. from New York University and an M.S. in finance from DePaul University.

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which CardRates.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). CardRates.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. See the credit card issuer's website for specific terms and conditions of each card.