The Ultimate Guide to Credit Cards
Wednesday, October 5, 2022

7 Options for When Your Credit Card Interest Rate Rises

6 Options For Rising Credit Card Interest Rates

credit card advice

Marcie Geffner

Written by: Marcie Geffner

Marcie Geffner

Marcie Geffner is an award-winning reporter, editor, and writer. Her stories about banking, credit cards, insurance, economics, small business, and other subjects have been featured by the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Bookmarks Magazine, FOX Business, CNBC, Yahoo! Finance, and dozens of major U.S. newspapers. Her articles have been cited in seven nonfiction books and two U.S. Congressional hearings. She edits nonfiction, memoir, and fiction, and contributes to Kirkus Reviews. Marcie holds a bachelor’s degree in English from UCLA and MBA from Pepperdine University.

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Edited by: Lillian Guevara-Castro

Lillian Guevara-Castro

Lillian brings more than 30 years of editing and journalism experience. She has written and edited for major news organizations, including The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the New York Times, and she previously served as an adjunct instructor at the University of Florida. Today, she edits all CardRates content for clarity, accuracy, and reader engagement.

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Advertiser Disclosure

There’s no doubt about it: Credit card interest rates are going up, and these rate hikes can hurt consumers who don’t pay off their card balances every month.

Rates are rising because the Federal Reserve hiked its benchmark federal funds rate earlier this year. Consumers don’t pay this rate directly, but when it goes up, market rates — the rates consumers do pay — also tend to move higher. In the article below, we’ll dive into important things to know — and actions to take — when interest rates rise, as well as seven options for rising credit card interest rates.

Interest Rates Have Risen More than 2 Percentage Points

In November, the Fed decided to hold its benchmark rate in the 2 to 2¼% range. Two years ago, the rate was near zero, a difference of 2 percentage points.

Card rates are significantly higher than the federal funds rate because banks add a profit margin, known as the spread.

The average card rate at the end of 2017 was about 13%, according to a July 2018 Fed study. That rate tracked the two-year Treasury, which had turned slightly and slowly upward since 2013, leaving spreads unchanged.

The average doesn’t mean everyone who has a card pays 13%. In fact, the Fed study also found that average card rates for people who were charged interest were closer to 15%. And that was before this year’s rate hikes.

Chart of Average Interest Rates on Credit Card Accounts, 1996 - 2017

Average interest rates on credit card accounts. Source: Federal Reserve Board, Form 2835a, Quarterly Report of Credit Card Plans.

How much interest you’ll pay if you carry a balance depends on your credit score, your payment history, the types of cards you have, among other factors.

“Interest rates charged vary considerably across credit card plans and borrowers, reflecting the various features of the plans and the risk profile of the cardholders,” the Fed stated.

The Fed may not be finished with its rate hikes. It’s powerful Federal Open Market Committee constantly monitors inflation, employment, and other measures of economic activity to make decisions about when to raise (or lower) the federal funds rate.

What To Do When Your Card Rate Rises

There’s no one best thing you should do if your card’s interest rate rises. Rather, there are a variety of actions you could take, each with pros and cons.

Here are seven options to consider:

1. Do Nothing

With most credit cards, you’ll pay zero interest if you pay your balance in full every month. In that case, it doesn’t matter whether your rate is higher or lower. You may want to shop for a new card to get better rewards or lower fees, but you won’t need to shop for a lower rate card.

2. Pay the Higher Rate

If you carry a balance and you can afford to pay the higher rate, you may want to just do so. Why? Maybe you carry a balance only rarely or only for a short time. Maybe your balance is low or you intend to pay it off soon. Maybe your card has low fees or a rewards program that you love. Whatever the reason, a higher rate doesn’t necessarily mean you have to dump your card.

3. Pay off Your Balance

If you’ve been carrying a balance and your rate rises, that may be a good incentive to pay off your card to lower or eliminate your monthly interest expense. If you never carry a balance again, you won’t be affected by your card’s higher rate.

4. Ask for a Lower Rate

If you normally carry a balance and are struggling to make your monthly card payment, you may want to call your card issuer and ask for a lower rate. If your card company wants to keep you as a customer, it may lower your rate as a courtesy. Ask when the lower rate expires so you can revisit your options and decide what to do next when that happens.

5. Transfer Your Balance to Another Card

If you have several cards and your rate rises on a card on which you carry a balance, call your card issuers and ask them about their balance transfer offers. Find out how much you can transfer, what rate you’ll be charged, and how much the transfer will cost.

Screenshot of the Chase Balance Transfer Page

You can call your issuers or visit their website to see which balance transfer offers you may qualify for.

Some cards offer very attractive programs to entice you to transfer an existing balance.

6. Shop for a New Balance Transfer Card

If you carry a balance and don’t have another card with an attractive balance transfer offer, a higher rate may be an incentive to apply for a new balance transfer card.

When you shop for a balance transfer card, look for a low promotional rate and balance transfer fee. Some cards offer a 0% initial rate and no balance transfer fee. Ask how long your promotional rate will last and what your full rate will be when that rate expires.

Transferred balances typically don’t earn rewards, so you can make those perks a low priority when you compare cards. Here are a few of our favorites:

Discover it® Balance Transfer Review

at Discover Card'ssecure website

0% BALANCE TRANSFER RATING
★★★★★
5.0
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  • INTRO OFFER: Unlimited Cashback Match – only from Discover. Discover will automatically match all the cash back you’ve earned at the end of your first year! There’s no minimum spending or maximum rewards. You could turn $150 cash back into $300.
  • Earn 5% cash back on everyday purchases at different places each quarter like Amazon.com, grocery stores, restaurants, gas stations and when you pay using PayPal, up to the quarterly maximum when you activate. Plus, earn unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases – automatically.
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  • Every $1 you earn in cash back is $1 you can redeem.
  • No annual fee.
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Intro (Purchases)
Intro (Transfers)
Regular APR
Annual Fee
Credit Needed
0% Intro APR for 6 months
0% Intro APR for 18 months
14.99% - 25.99% Variable APR
$0
Excellent/Good
0% BALANCE TRANSFER RATING
★★★★★
4.9
OVERALL RATING
  • No Late Fees, No Penalty Rate, and No Annual Fee... Ever
  • 0% Intro APR for 21 months on balance transfers from date of first transfer and 0% Intro APR for 12 months on purchases from date of account opening. After that the variable APR will be 17.74% - 27.74%, based on your creditworthiness. Balance transfers must be completed within 4 months of account opening.
  • There is a balance transfer fee of either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
  • Stay protected with Citi® Quick Lock and $0 liability on unauthorized charges
Intro (Purchases)
Intro (Transfers)
Regular APR
Annual Fee
Credit Needed
0% Intro APR Period 12 months on Purchases
0% Intro APR Period 21 months on Balance Transfers
17.74% - 27.74% (Variable)
$0
Excellent, Good Credit

Additional Disclosure: Citi is a CardRates advertiser.

0% BALANCE TRANSFER RATING
★★★★★
4.9
OVERALL RATING
  • 0% Intro APR for 21 months on balance transfers from date of first transfer and 0% Intro APR for 12 months on purchases from date of account opening. After that the variable APR will be 16.74% - 26.74%, based on your creditworthiness. Balance transfers must be completed within 4 months of account opening.
  • There is a balance transfer fee of either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater
  • Get free access to your FICO® Score online.
  • With Citi Entertainment®, get special access to purchase tickets to thousands of events, including concerts, sporting events, dining experiences and more.
Intro (Purchases)
Intro (Transfers)
Regular APR
Annual Fee
Credit Needed
0% 12 months on Purchases
0% 21 months on Balance Transfers
16.74% - 26.74% (Variable)
$0
Excellent, Good

Additional Disclosure: Citi is a CardRates advertiser.

You might need to call your card issuer to transfer your balance and you should continue to make your payment until the transfer is complete.

Don’t make a habit of using balance transfer cards to juggle more debt than you can afford. A better approach is to reduce your spending—radically, if necessary—until you can pay off all your card balances every month.

7. Close Your Account

Rising card rates can be a good incentive to review all your cards and make sure you’re happy with them. If you have a card that you don’t need, you can stick it in a drawer and not use it. If it has an annual fee, you may want to call the card issuer and cancel it. Keep in mind that canceling cards can affect your credit score.

Your Interest Rate is Just One Factor to Consider

There’s no right number of credit cards that you should have. Some people manage with just a few. Others want and use dozens to maximize their rewards. Card rates are just one factor, albeit an important one, you should consider when you choose which cards you want to apply for and use most often.

Advertiser Disclosure

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